Uncover the History of Aboriginal Cultures

IN THE DIVERSE CITY OF MELBOURNE

With the First Peoples wing at the Melbourne Museum and the native plant species inhabiting the Royal Botanical Gardens, Melbourne is an ideal place to delve deep into Aboriginal culture and discover what life was like for native Australians spanning millions of years! Iwara Travel has compiled a range of experiences for every type of traveller.

MUSEUM FIRST PEOPLES TOUR
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ROYAL BOTANICAL GARDEN TOURS
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BRAMBUK NATIONAL PARK & CULTURE CENTRE
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Narana Cultural Centre & Experience
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MELBOURNE GROUP TOURS AND ACTIVITIES

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ABORIGINAL OWNED & GUIDED
TOP RATED ON TRIPADVISOR
DIVERSE & UNIQUE EXPERIENCES

About Aboriginal Melbourne

IWARA TRAVEL - YOUR CULTURAL CONNECTOR

The Wurundjeri are a people of the Indigenous Australian nation of the Wurundjeri language group, in the Kulin alliance. They historically occupied the Birrarung (Yarra River) Valley, its tributaries and the present location of Melbourne. Before European settlement, they lived as all people of the Kulin nation lived, on the land, predominantly as hunters and gatherers, for tens of thousands of years.

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Seasonal changes in the weather, availability of foods and other factors would determine where campsites were located, many near the Birrarung and its tributaries.

Wurundjeri people spoke the Woiwurrung language. Wurundjeri refers to the people who occupy one tribal territory, while Woiwurrung refers to the language group shared by the other tribal territory groups and clans within the Woiwurrung territory. Some tribes in this territory are Gunung Willam Balluk, Kurung Jang Balluk, Marin Balluk and others. The Woiwurrung people’s territory extended from north of the Great Dividing Range, east to Mount Baw Baw, south to Mordialloc Creek and west to Werribee River. Their lands bordered the Gunai/Kurnai people to the east in Gippsland, the Bunurong people to the south on the Mornington Peninsula, and the Dja Dja Wurrung and Taungurung to the north. Wurundjeri people take their name from the word wurun meaning Manna Gum (Eucalyptus viminalis) which is common along Birrarung, and djeri, a grub found in the tree.

See Melbourne in a New Way

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